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Reblogueado desde darksilenceinsuburbia

 

Tristan Pigott

Urban Neurosis

Sunday Morning Overground

What’s Your Point

Running

Daily Assault

Reblogueado desde pixography
 

Salvador Dali ~ “Family of Marsupial Centaurs”, 1940

In the 1940s, Dali announced – in a kind of paradox so typical of him – that he was “becoming classical,” and “Family of Marsupial Centaurs” certainly has a classical tone and technique about it, exuding an almost Renaissance-era feel. It’s quite a departure from what we might typically associate with the Spanish surrealist. It may, in fact, be one of the best examples of the nexus at which Dali the surrealist and Dali the “classicist” merged. 
Dali had long been obsessed with the notion of intra-uterine memories and claimed with seriousness that he vividly recalled his time inside the womb! He wrote and expounded many times on what he called the “traumatism of birth,” and a number of his important surrealist paintings are themed around an intra-uterine world – more “real” than imagined, according to Dali. There’s even a photo-illustration of him in the fetal position, inside an egg, published on one of the opening pages of his book, “The Secret Life of Salvador Dali”.
Here, in this unusual but remarkably well-painted canvas, we see a family not of human beings, but of centaurs – mythical creatures from Greek mythology, whose heads are human but whose bodies are that of a horse. Like marsupials, which carry their young in a pouch, in Dali’s world the human-horse creatures now take on marsupial qualities, while babies emerge freely from their mothers’ womb, and no doubt could return to them as they please.  <source>

 

Salvador Dali ~ “Family of Marsupial Centaurs”, 1940

In the 1940s, Dali announced – in a kind of paradox so typical of him – that he was “becoming classical,” and “Family of Marsupial Centaurs” certainly has a classical tone and technique about it, exuding an almost Renaissance-era feel. It’s quite a departure from what we might typically associate with the Spanish surrealist. It may, in fact, be one of the best examples of the nexus at which Dali the surrealist and Dali the “classicist” merged. 

Dali had long been obsessed with the notion of intra-uterine memories and claimed with seriousness that he vividly recalled his time inside the womb! He wrote and expounded many times on what he called the “traumatism of birth,” and a number of his important surrealist paintings are themed around an intra-uterine world – more “real” than imagined, according to Dali. There’s even a photo-illustration of him in the fetal position, inside an egg, published on one of the opening pages of his book, “The Secret Life of Salvador Dali”.

Here, in this unusual but remarkably well-painted canvas, we see a family not of human beings, but of centaurs – mythical creatures from Greek mythology, whose heads are human but whose bodies are that of a horse. Like marsupials, which carry their young in a pouch, in Dali’s world the human-horse creatures now take on marsupial qualities, while babies emerge freely from their mothers’ womb, and no doubt could return to them as they please.  <source>

Reblogueado desde nuclearbummer
Reblogueado desde pixography

René Magritte - “The Importance of Marvels”, 1927


René Magritte - “The Importance of Marvels, 1927

Reblogueado desde booooooom
Reblogueado desde darksilenceinsuburbia
Reblogueado desde mfjr
mfjr:

Requiem for a Dream | 2000 | Darren Aronofsky

mfjr:

Requiem for a Dream | 2000 | Darren Aronofsky

(vía ph4ntasmag0ria)

Reblogueado desde darksilenceinsuburbia

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Jenny Riffle

Scavenger: Adventures in Treasure Hunting

Reblogueado desde archiemcphee

archiemcphee:

Indian sand sculptor Sudarsan Pattinaik and 30 of his students created a massive installation depicting 500 Santas or ‘Sand-tas’ on the beach behind Panthanivas hotel in Puri, Odisha, India. Created in December 2012, the piece required nearly 5000 tons of sand and took about 4 days to complete. Intended to raise awareness about global warming, the displaced Santas were sculpted along with one large sand sculpture of Jesus and the message “Go green, save Earth.”

“I always try to give some awareness messages through my sculpture to the world, so I chose the awareness about global warming through Santas as the subject at the year end,” Pattnaik told the India Education Diary.

[via Inhabitat and Design Taxi]

Reblogueado desde darksilenceinsuburbia

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Jack Stewart

1. Mico, 1973

2. Butch 2,1974

3. Tracy 168 and Pro-Soul, 1973

4. Lee, Mickey Mouse, Dec. 1977

5. Phase 2 (Bubble Letter), 1972

6. Worm, By Riff I, 1972

7. Beetle Bailey by Cliff, c.1970

8. Topcat 126,1972

Reblogueado desde darksilenceinsuburbia

darksilenceinsuburbia:

James Ostrer

Photographer James Ostrer documents our obsession with sugar in a series of grotesque real life portraits of people covered in layers of sweets and junk food. Speaking largely on the to the global food production and increasingly dangerous methods of mass production, Ostrer’s photographs conjure tribal images that are both fascinating and repulsive. Via the press release, “This adornment becomes a mask of what we eat which then becomes entwined with a hyper-pop sensibility and an obsequious inquiry into the great volumes of sugar that flow through our bodies.”

Reblogueado desde pixography
pixography:

Salvador Dalí ~ “Equestrian Molecular Figure”, 1952

pixography:

Salvador Dalí ~ “Equestrian Molecular Figure”, 1952

Reblogueado desde pixography
pixography:

Rex van Minnen

pixography:

Rex van Minnen